As we age, bone mass depletes faster than our bodies can replace it. This happens even more acutely in women as compared to men.

But here's the good news- there's plenty we can do in our lives to ensure that our bones stay healthy and strong.

When it comes to food - go au naturel!
Why are processed foods bad for you? Most processed foods contain high levels of sodium. High levels of sodium cause calcium secretion. Remember, you need calcium to replace old bone mass. Opt for preparing your own meals. It'll be easy on your pocket - in the short-term and long!

Switch your candy for fruits
The temptation to order ice-creams or brownies as your dessert can be almost too much to bear. Try keeping dry fruits like raisins, which have natural sugar and calcium, in your purse.

Go easy on the caffeine
Your early morning cuppa might be harming your bones! Opt for a decaf once in a while.

Throw away the cigarettes
If you needed another reason to quit smoking, here's one: smoking can

Get more calcium and Vitamin K
You already know that Vitamin K helps with blood clotting. But it also helps make proteins that makes bones healthy. Foods like broccoli and kale are high in both Vitamin K and calcium.

Avoid Alcohol
Long-term alcohol consumption can interfere with bone growth and replacement of bone tissue (i.e., remodeling), resulting in decreased bone density and increased risk of fracture.

Even a little exercise matters!
Women who exercise regularly are at lower risk of bone depletion than women who don’t. Just a simple exercise like brisk walking daily can help in keeping your bones healthy!

Source:

  1. http://www.iofbonehealth.org/facts-statistics
  2. http://apps.who.int/bmi/index.jsp?introPage=intro_3.html
  3. http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/content/5/Supplement_1/S23.full
  4. http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/6/2/729
  5. http://advances.nutrition.org/content/4/2/151.full
  6. http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/bone/bone_health/nutrition/vitamin_a.asp
  7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25412684
  8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24090644
  9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3775240/
  10. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3461213/
  11. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002404.htm
  12. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/vitamink.html
  13. http://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/lactose-intolerance-and-osteoporosis

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